10 Things That Won’t Help You Sell Your Home

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November 3, 2015 at 7:31 pm  •  Posted in Uncategorized by  •  0 Comments

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In the last few years HOUZZ, the website about all things in housing, has grown to become an excellent research tool for builders, real estate agents and frankly just about anyone! Below is a list of common household design elements that many homeowners absolutely refuse to have in their home—according to a recent, lively Houzz discussion.

  • Carpet. Wood floors are in. Good wood floors or expensive tile. We see wood flooring in all rooms everywhere in the U.S. and a growing trend to use high end tile in LR/DRs—especially in the South and West.
  • Laminate Flooring. In many people’s minds, it says cheap, cheap, cheap. Yet at the top end, the new laminates, look and feel like real wood, tile or slate. You just can’t go low end.
  • Taxidermy. The first thing a stager will remove from a home before marketing is anything stuffed – standing or mounted on the wall.
  • Vertical Blinds. Nothing says 70’s more than this. You might as well add a black light and play Dance Fever as you show the home.
  • Cheap Fake Flowers. Go expensive and no one will know; go cheap and you will regret it.
  • Wallpaper. Many people think or have an image in their head from a long, long, long time ago. Builders in the 60’s and 70’s used to put it in the foyers and bathrooms of new homes. That era has long gone. I can remember women in the sales offices spending hours looking at 1000’s of pages of wallpaper to find that perfect one. Unfortunately, that seller’s “perfect one” is not a buyer’s “perfect one.” We are seeing a few high end, designer wallpapers with textured surfaces used sparingly as an accent piece. But never a whole room.
  • Knickknacks. Why would anyone want all these dust collectors? A small collection is fine; a large collection turns buyers off. People look at the knickknacks and not the home.
  • Florescent Lighting. In many people’s minds it says “workshop”- it totally lacks any home-y feeling. Above the workbench in the garage is about the only place it is acceptable.
  • Recliners. They take up too much room and make the home look smaller. People who have them, love them; buyers loath them, thus to sell you must temporarily remove them.
  • Clowns. Most kids are scared of clowns; subliminally, this gets carried over to adulthood. Seeing clown photos, statues, etc. turns off too many people to risk having a buyer see them in your home. Have you ever seen a builder decorate a model in a clown theme? Enough said.

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